The tendency of contemporary decision-making strategies to deny the condition of alzheimer disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Even the most cursory review of the contemporary bioethical literature reveals that respect for the autonomy of patients has become the leading bioethical principle, easily trumping more traditional principles such as the principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence. This principle has been operationalized most clearly in the patient's right to grant informed consent to proposed medical interventions. Health care providers may not initiate treatment, including palliative treatment, unless the patient has consented. Except in medical emergencies, informed consent is a necessary condition of treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEthical Foundations of Palliative Care for Alzheimer Disease
PublisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press
Pages163-180
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)0801878705, 9780801898396
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The tendency of contemporary decision-making strategies to deny the condition of alzheimer disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Welie, J. V. M. (2010). The tendency of contemporary decision-making strategies to deny the condition of alzheimer disease. In Ethical Foundations of Palliative Care for Alzheimer Disease (pp. 163-180). The Johns Hopkins University Press.