Transfusion of blood and blood products

Indications and complications

Sanjeev Sharma, Poonam K Sharma, Lisa N. Tyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Red blood cell transfusions are used to treat hemorrhage and to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. Transfusion of red blood cells should be based on the patient's clinical condition. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anemia (causing shortness of breath, dizziness, congestive heart failure, and decreased exercise tolerance), acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30 percent of blood volume. Fresh frozen plasma infusion can be used for reversal of anticoagulant effects. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent hemorrhage in patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet function defects. Cryoprecipitate is used in cases of hypofbrinogenemia, which most often occurs in the setting of massive hemorrhage or consumptive coagulopathy. Transfusion-related infections are less common than noninfectious complications. All noninfectious complications of transfusion are classified as noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. Acute complications occur within minutes to 24 hours of the transfusion, whereas delayed complications may develop days, months, or even years later.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-724
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume83
Issue number6
StatePublished - Mar 15 2011

Fingerprint

Blood Transfusion
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Hemorrhage
Platelet Transfusion
Exercise Tolerance
Dizziness
Blood Volume
Thrombocytopenia
Dyspnea
Anticoagulants
Anemia
Blood Platelets
Heart Failure
Oxygen
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Transfusion of blood and blood products : Indications and complications. / Sharma, Sanjeev; Sharma, Poonam K; Tyler, Lisa N.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 83, No. 6, 15.03.2011, p. 719-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Sanjeev ; Sharma, Poonam K ; Tyler, Lisa N. / Transfusion of blood and blood products : Indications and complications. In: American Family Physician. 2011 ; Vol. 83, No. 6. pp. 719-724.
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