Treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

Delusions and hallucinations in patients with Parkinson’s disease, a condition known as Parkinson’s disease psychosis (PDP), have historically been treated with clozapine and quetiapine because of their relatively low likelihood of worsening motor symptoms. Although clozapine is considered the drug of choice, it is underused in this population because of the need for frequent monitoring. Quetiapine, on the other hand, is generally first-line treatment despite its questionable efficacy. Consequently, in 2006, the American Academy of Neurology identified a need for the development of a novel antipsychotic with evidence of both safety and efficacy in patients with PDP. Pimavanserin, which has shown promise in clinical trials, recently became the first agent to receive FDA approval for the treatment of PDP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PagesHS20-HS26
Volume41
No11
Specialist publicationU.S. Pharmacist
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Psychotic Disorders
Parkinson Disease
Clozapine
Delusions
Hallucinations
Therapeutics
Antipsychotic Agents
Clinical Trials
Safety
Monitoring
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Quetiapine Fumarate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis. / Schleisman, Andrew; Spangler, Mikayla L.; Knezevich, Emily.

In: U.S. Pharmacist, Vol. 41, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. HS20-HS26.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Schleisman, Andrew ; Spangler, Mikayla L. ; Knezevich, Emily. / Treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis. In: U.S. Pharmacist. 2016 ; Vol. 41, No. 11. pp. HS20-HS26.
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