Tumor variation in the cancer family syndrome

Ovarian cancer

Henry T. Lynch, Patrick M. Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Cancer Family Syndrome is a hereditary disorder (autosomal dominant), characterized by early onset cancer of the colon (particularly the proximal colon) and endometrium, with an excess of multiple primary cancers. Recent evidence reflects the possibility of an even broader tumor spectrum consisting of carcinoma of the stomach, the ovary, the kidney, and possibly other organs. A family with the cardinal features of the Cancer Family Syndrome is described, including two sisters and their mother who had ovarian carcinoma at early ages (38, 46, and 49 years). Two of these three women have shown unusual tolerance to cancer, despite invasion of the primary tumors. Implications for cancer surveillance and management are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-442
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume138
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Endometrium
Colonic Neoplasms
Siblings
Ovary
Stomach
Colon
Mothers
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Tumor variation in the cancer family syndrome : Ovarian cancer. / Lynch, Henry T.; Lynch, Patrick M.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 138, No. 3, 1979, p. 439-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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