US domestic politics and international cooperation, 1953-1998

Volker Krause, Susumu Suzuki, Richard C. Witmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following previous scholarship on domestic sources of foreign policy, this study investigates the extent to which economic performance, political constraints, and other factors influence US international cooperation from 1953 through 1998. Using data on US international treaties and executive agreements, we estimate a set of event count models. We find that the US enters into more international treaties and executive agreements with increased inflation. There are fewer new international treaties and executive agreements under divided government and during a president's first year in office. Furthermore, there are fewer new international executive agreements during war involvement. Finally, the US substitutes international treaties and executive agreements for one another, and there are rising trends over time in the numbers of US international treaties and executive agreements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)620-643
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Politics
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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national politics
international cooperation
international agreement
politics
foreign policy
inflation
policy studies
treaty
president
economics
event
trend
performance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

US domestic politics and international cooperation, 1953-1998. / Krause, Volker; Suzuki, Susumu; Witmer, Richard C.

In: International Politics, Vol. 43, No. 5, 11.2006, p. 620-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krause, Volker ; Suzuki, Susumu ; Witmer, Richard C. / US domestic politics and international cooperation, 1953-1998. In: International Politics. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 5. pp. 620-643.
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