Use of Creatine and Creatinine to Minimize Doxorubicin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Doxorubicin (DOX), an effective anticancer agent, can damage cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue via excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Supplemental creatine (Cr) has been shown to have a therapeutic role in disease states characterized by increased oxidative stress. To investigate the effects of Cr and creatinine (CrN) on DOX-induced cytotoxicity. Cultured L6 and H9C2 myoblasts were exposed to 25 μM DOX, 10 mM Cr, 10 mM CrN, 25 μM DOX + 10 mM Cr, 25 μM DOX + 10 mM CrN, or control media for 12 h. Viability was assessed using Confocal and Widefield imaging. Immunoblotting was used to determine protein expression. Viability was lowest in the DOX-treated group regardless of cell type; however, when DOX was combined with Cr or CrN, viability was improved. Levels of oxidative stress, as measured by 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the DOX treated cells vs. controls; however, Cr + DOX and CrN + DOX significantly lowered 4HNE levels compared to DOX-treated cells. Creatine kinase (CK), a key marker of cellular damage, was significantly higher in DOX-treated H9c2 cells vs. controls. However, Cr or CrN in combination with DOX, resulted in no significant differences in CK vs. controls. Supplementation with Cr or CrN may preserve cell viability during DOX treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNutrition and Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

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