Use of yellow plastic food wrap to retard composite resin polymerization

Mark S. Hagge, Scott C. Di Lorenzo, James S. Lindemuth, Mark A. Latta, James W. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Dental chair lights can rapidly polymerize light-reactive composites beyond the point of workability, preventing adequate time for the shaping and sculpting of large direct composite restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light would perceptibly retard the polymerization rate of a light-cured composite (Esthet-X™, shade A1, Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Materials and Methods: Zero, one, and two thicknesses of yellow plastic food wrap (Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, VA, USA) were, in turn, used in the following scenarios: (1) placed in a spectrophotometer and compared for percentage transmission of 470 nm light; (2) placed over a curing unit light wand and compared for milliwatts of output on a radiometer; (3) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from 0.22 mm thick composite specimens, with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry readings made every 40 seconds to measure degree of composite polymerization; (4) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from a direct veneer preparation (clinical simulation), which was then restored by four experienced clinicians who reported working times. Results: Results for the scenarios were as follows: (1) zero sheets 100%, one sheet 34%, two sheets 6%; (2) zero sheets 580 mW, one sheet 190 mW, two sheets 20 mW; (3) percent conversion at 80 seconds - zero sheets 8%, one sheet 0.65%, two sheets 0.76%; percent conversion at 120 seconds - zero sheets 19.11%, one sheet 12.22%, two sheets 0.42%; (4) mean working times - zero sheets 34 seconds, one sheet 72 seconds, two sheets 155 seconds. Conclusions: Yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light markedly extended the working time of a light-cured composite in each of four assessments performed. Two sheets of plastic wrap were more than twice as effective as one sheet.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-375
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry
Volume15
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2003

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Composite Resins
Polymerization
Plastics
Light
Food
Tooth
Fourier Analysis
Reading
Spectrum Analysis
Metals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Hagge, M. S., Di Lorenzo, S. C., Lindemuth, J. S., Latta, M. A., & Smith, J. W. (2003). Use of yellow plastic food wrap to retard composite resin polymerization. Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, 15(6), 370-375.

Use of yellow plastic food wrap to retard composite resin polymerization. / Hagge, Mark S.; Di Lorenzo, Scott C.; Lindemuth, James S.; Latta, Mark A.; Smith, James W.

In: Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, Vol. 15, No. 6, 2003, p. 370-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hagge, MS, Di Lorenzo, SC, Lindemuth, JS, Latta, MA & Smith, JW 2003, 'Use of yellow plastic food wrap to retard composite resin polymerization', Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 370-375.
Hagge, Mark S. ; Di Lorenzo, Scott C. ; Lindemuth, James S. ; Latta, Mark A. ; Smith, James W. / Use of yellow plastic food wrap to retard composite resin polymerization. In: Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 370-375.
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abstract = "Background: Dental chair lights can rapidly polymerize light-reactive composites beyond the point of workability, preventing adequate time for the shaping and sculpting of large direct composite restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light would perceptibly retard the polymerization rate of a light-cured composite (Esthet-X™, shade A1, Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Materials and Methods: Zero, one, and two thicknesses of yellow plastic food wrap (Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, VA, USA) were, in turn, used in the following scenarios: (1) placed in a spectrophotometer and compared for percentage transmission of 470 nm light; (2) placed over a curing unit light wand and compared for milliwatts of output on a radiometer; (3) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from 0.22 mm thick composite specimens, with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry readings made every 40 seconds to measure degree of composite polymerization; (4) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from a direct veneer preparation (clinical simulation), which was then restored by four experienced clinicians who reported working times. Results: Results for the scenarios were as follows: (1) zero sheets 100{\%}, one sheet 34{\%}, two sheets 6{\%}; (2) zero sheets 580 mW, one sheet 190 mW, two sheets 20 mW; (3) percent conversion at 80 seconds - zero sheets 8{\%}, one sheet 0.65{\%}, two sheets 0.76{\%}; percent conversion at 120 seconds - zero sheets 19.11{\%}, one sheet 12.22{\%}, two sheets 0.42{\%}; (4) mean working times - zero sheets 34 seconds, one sheet 72 seconds, two sheets 155 seconds. Conclusions: Yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light markedly extended the working time of a light-cured composite in each of four assessments performed. Two sheets of plastic wrap were more than twice as effective as one sheet.",
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AU - Di Lorenzo, Scott C.

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AU - Smith, James W.

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N2 - Background: Dental chair lights can rapidly polymerize light-reactive composites beyond the point of workability, preventing adequate time for the shaping and sculpting of large direct composite restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light would perceptibly retard the polymerization rate of a light-cured composite (Esthet-X™, shade A1, Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Materials and Methods: Zero, one, and two thicknesses of yellow plastic food wrap (Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, VA, USA) were, in turn, used in the following scenarios: (1) placed in a spectrophotometer and compared for percentage transmission of 470 nm light; (2) placed over a curing unit light wand and compared for milliwatts of output on a radiometer; (3) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from 0.22 mm thick composite specimens, with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry readings made every 40 seconds to measure degree of composite polymerization; (4) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from a direct veneer preparation (clinical simulation), which was then restored by four experienced clinicians who reported working times. Results: Results for the scenarios were as follows: (1) zero sheets 100%, one sheet 34%, two sheets 6%; (2) zero sheets 580 mW, one sheet 190 mW, two sheets 20 mW; (3) percent conversion at 80 seconds - zero sheets 8%, one sheet 0.65%, two sheets 0.76%; percent conversion at 120 seconds - zero sheets 19.11%, one sheet 12.22%, two sheets 0.42%; (4) mean working times - zero sheets 34 seconds, one sheet 72 seconds, two sheets 155 seconds. Conclusions: Yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light markedly extended the working time of a light-cured composite in each of four assessments performed. Two sheets of plastic wrap were more than twice as effective as one sheet.

AB - Background: Dental chair lights can rapidly polymerize light-reactive composites beyond the point of workability, preventing adequate time for the shaping and sculpting of large direct composite restorations. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light would perceptibly retard the polymerization rate of a light-cured composite (Esthet-X™, shade A1, Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Materials and Methods: Zero, one, and two thicknesses of yellow plastic food wrap (Reynolds Metals Company, Richmond, VA, USA) were, in turn, used in the following scenarios: (1) placed in a spectrophotometer and compared for percentage transmission of 470 nm light; (2) placed over a curing unit light wand and compared for milliwatts of output on a radiometer; (3) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from 0.22 mm thick composite specimens, with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry readings made every 40 seconds to measure degree of composite polymerization; (4) placed over a dental chair light positioned 64 cm from a direct veneer preparation (clinical simulation), which was then restored by four experienced clinicians who reported working times. Results: Results for the scenarios were as follows: (1) zero sheets 100%, one sheet 34%, two sheets 6%; (2) zero sheets 580 mW, one sheet 190 mW, two sheets 20 mW; (3) percent conversion at 80 seconds - zero sheets 8%, one sheet 0.65%, two sheets 0.76%; percent conversion at 120 seconds - zero sheets 19.11%, one sheet 12.22%, two sheets 0.42%; (4) mean working times - zero sheets 34 seconds, one sheet 72 seconds, two sheets 155 seconds. Conclusions: Yellow plastic food wrap placed over a dental chair light markedly extended the working time of a light-cured composite in each of four assessments performed. Two sheets of plastic wrap were more than twice as effective as one sheet.

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