Using a quasi-experimental research design to assess knowledge in continuing medical education programs.

Ronald J. Markert, Sally C. O'Neill, Subhash Bhatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a year-long medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. METHOD: A randomized separate-sample pretest/past-test design, a quasi-experimental technique, was used. Nine CME programs with a sufficient number of participants were identified a priori. Knowledge acquisition was compared between the control group and the intervention group for the nine individual programs and for the combined programs. RESULTS: A total of 667 physicians, nurses, and other health professionals participated. Significant gain in knowledge was found for six programs: Perinatology, Pain Management, Fertility Care 2, Pediatrics, Colorectal Diseases, and Alzheimer's Disease (each p < .001). Also, the intervention group differed from the control group when the nine programs were combined (p < .001), with an effect size of .84. DISCUSSION: The use of sound quasi-experimental research methodology (separate-sample pretest/post-test design), the inclusion of a representative sample of CME programs, and the analysis of nearly 700 subjects led us to have confidence in concluding that our CME participants acquired a meaningful amount of new knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-161
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of continuing education in the health professions
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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research planning
knowledge acquisition
education
Group
dementia
health professionals
pain
fertility
nurse
confidence
inclusion
physician
health care
Disease
decision making
methodology
management
knowledge

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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Using a quasi-experimental research design to assess knowledge in continuing medical education programs. / Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash.

In: The Journal of continuing education in the health professions, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.01.2003, p. 157-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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