Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement

William J. Tastle, Mark J. Wierman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The information-theoretic measures of consensus, dissent and agreement are used to address the problem of the assignment of weights in recognition of expert opinions, and interval weights to reflect categorical weights. All measures are bounded in the 0 to 1 interval. Dissent is also interpreted as an indicator of dispersion. Thus, the values selected by a panel of experts is calculated for each targeted category and the category with the highest resulting value is the one chosen to represent the overall expert judgment. Further, the distances between threat levels can be calculated and the dispersion for the distribution may also be calculated. This is different from the standard statistical measures of variance for categorical values are based on an ordinal scale of ordered categories and the standard deviation requires the presence of an interval or ratio scale. Illustrations are shown to describe the functionality of the measures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society
Pages31-35
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
EventNAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2007Jun 27 2007

Other

OtherNAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period6/24/076/27/07

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Media Technology

Cite this

Tastle, W. J., & Wierman, M. J. (2007). Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement. In NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society (pp. 31-35). [4271029] https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2007.383806

Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement. / Tastle, William J.; Wierman, Mark J.

NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society. 2007. p. 31-35 4271029.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tastle, WJ & Wierman, MJ 2007, Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement. in NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society., 4271029, pp. 31-35, NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society, San Diego, CA, United States, 6/24/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2007.383806
Tastle WJ, Wierman MJ. Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement. In NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society. 2007. p. 31-35. 4271029 https://doi.org/10.1109/NAFIPS.2007.383806
Tastle, William J. ; Wierman, Mark J. / Using consensus to measure weighted targeted agreement. NAFIPS 2007: 2007 Annual Meeting of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society. 2007. pp. 31-35
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