Visualizing carrier status

Fragile X syndrome and genetic diagnosis since the 1940s

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What does it look like to be the carrier of a genetic disease? Carrier status may be determined through the visual analysis of both genotypic and phenotypic evidence. Over the past 70 years, clinical geneticists have depended upon multiple strategies for identifying disease carriers within a family. This has included pedigree analysis, which was based upon clinical observations of individual family members and, in recent decades, cytogenetic and molecular methods. Newer techniques have offered novel opportunities to actually see the suspected etiological markers of certain genetic diseases, such as Fragile X syndrome. The visualization of these markers has both clarified and confused previously observed inheritance patterns, in some cases leading to the development of newly distinct diagnostic categories. As a result, what it means to be affected by, or the carrier of, a genetic disease has continuously evolved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-84
Number of pages8
JournalEndeavour
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carrier
1940s
Syndrome
Genetic Disease
Diagnostics
Cytogenetics
Visualization
Visual Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Visualizing carrier status : Fragile X syndrome and genetic diagnosis since the 1940s. / Hogan, Andrew J.

In: Endeavour, Vol. 36, No. 2, 06.2012, p. 77-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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