Vitamin D supplementation in young white and African American women

John Christopher G. Gallagher, Prachi S. Jindal, Lynette M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is limited information on the effects of vitamin D on serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) in young people and none on African Americans. The main objective of this trial was to measure the effect of different doses of vitamin D3 on serum 25OHD and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) in young women with vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25OHD ≤ 20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L). A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of vitamin D3 was conducted in young white and African American women, age 25 to 45 years. A total of 198 healthy white (60%) and African American (40%) women were randomly assigned to placebo, or to 400, 800, 1600, or 2400 IU of vitamin D3 daily. Calcium supplements were added to maintain a total calcium intake of 1000 to 1200 mg daily. The primary outcomes of the study were the final serum 25OHD and PTH levels at 12 months. The absolute increase in serum 25OHD with 400, 800, 1600, and 2400 IU of vitamin D daily was slightly greater in African American women than in white women. On the highest dose of 2400 IU/d, the mixed model predicted that mean 25OHD increased from baseline 12.4 ng/mL (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.2-15.7) to 43.2 ng/mL (95% CI, 38.2-48.1) in African American women and from 15.0 ng/mL (95% CI, 12.3-17.6) to 39.1 ng/mL (95% CI, 36.2-42.0) in white women. There was no significant effect of vitamin D dose on serum PTH in either race but there was a significant inverse relationship between final serum PTH and serum 25OHD. Serum 25OHD exceeded 20 ng/mL in 97.5% of whites on the 400 IU/d dose and between 800 and 1600 IU/d for African Americans. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) suggested by the Institute of Medicine for young people is 600 IU daily. The increase in serum 25OHD after vitamin D supplementation was similar in young and old, and in white and African American women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-181
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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Vitamin D
African Americans
Serum
Parathyroid Hormone
Cholecalciferol
Confidence Intervals
Placebos
Calcium
Recommended Dietary Allowances
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Vitamin D supplementation in young white and African American women. / Gallagher, John Christopher G.; Jindal, Prachi S.; Smith, Lynette M.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 173-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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