Vitamin D Supplementation Practices in Breastfed Infants in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

Megan Saathoff, Corrine Hanson, Ann Anderson-Berry, Elizabeth Lyden, Cristina F. Fernández

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the daily recommendation from 200 to 400 IU per day of vitamin D for all infants. Therefore, it has become vital for pediatricians and other healthcare providers to recommend and verify that their patients are on vitamin D supplementation. Objective. To investigate the proportion of pediatricians recommending vitamin D at the first and 6-month visit in infants and to determine predictors of vitamin D supplementation practices. Methods. Retrospective chart review of 219 patients seen at well baby pediatric visits to document the vitamin D supplementation practices. The Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher's exact test were used to make comparisons of weight, gestational age, gender, breastfeeding status, and insurance status based on vitamin D practices. Results. Eighty-seven percent of exclusively breastfed infants had no pediatrician recommendations for supplemental vitamin D at the first pediatrician visit, and 71% had no recommendations for vitamin D supplementation at the 6-month visit. There were no statistically significant data suggesting that vitamin D practices vary based on a patient's gestational age, weight, gender, or insurance. Conclusion. Compliance with the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation to provide 400 IU per day of vitamin D to infants is very low.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalInfant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

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Ambulatory Care Facilities
vitamin D
Vitamin D
Pediatrics
pediatricians
gestational age
insurance
Nonparametric Statistics
Gestational Age
Weights and Measures
Insurance Coverage
gender
breast feeding
infants
Insurance
Breast Feeding
Health Personnel
compliance
health services
testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Vitamin D Supplementation Practices in Breastfed Infants in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics. / Saathoff, Megan; Hanson, Corrine; Anderson-Berry, Ann; Lyden, Elizabeth; Fernández, Cristina F.

In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition, Vol. 6, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 122-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saathoff, Megan ; Hanson, Corrine ; Anderson-Berry, Ann ; Lyden, Elizabeth ; Fernández, Cristina F. / Vitamin D Supplementation Practices in Breastfed Infants in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics. In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 122-126.
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