Vitamin E improves bone quality in the aged but not in young adult male mice

Bahram H. Arjmandi, Shanil Juma, Alison Beharka, Mahendra S. Bapna, Mohammed P. Akhter, Simin N. Meydani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

It is generally viewed that with advancing age, humans and other animals including mice experience a gradual decline in the rate of bone formation. This, in part, may be due to the rise in oxygen-derived free radical formation. Vitamin E, a strong antioxidant, functions as a free radical scavenger that potentially can suppress bone resorption while stimulating bone formation. Although the effects of vitamin E on immune functions are well documented, there is a paucity of information on its effect on skeletal health in vivo. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of vitamin E supplementation on bone in young adult and old mice. Six and twenty-four month-old male C57BL/6NIA mice each were divided into two groups and fed a diet containing either adequate (30 mg/kg diet) or high (500 mg/kg diet) levels of vitamin E. Thirty days later, mice were killed and bones were removed for analyses including biomechanical testing using three-point bending and mRNA expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), osteocalcin, and type 1α-collagen using Northern blot. In old but not the young adult mice, high-dose vitamin E enhanced bone quality as evident by improved material and structural bone properties in comparison with adequate. This improved quality was accompanied by increases in bone dry weight, protein, and mRNA transcripts for osteocalcin, type Iα-collagen, and IGF-I. These data demonstrate that high-dose vitamin E has pronounced effects on bone quality as well as matrix protein in old mice by augmenting bone matrix protein without reducing bone mineralization as evidenced by unaltered bone density.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)543-549
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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Vitamin E
Young Adult
Bone
Bone and Bones
Osteocalcin
Collagen Type I
Diet
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Osteogenesis
Nutrition
Physiologic Calcification
Messenger RNA
Free Radical Scavengers
Bone Matrix
Proteins
Bone Resorption
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Northern Blotting
Bone Density
Free Radicals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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Vitamin E improves bone quality in the aged but not in young adult male mice. / Arjmandi, Bahram H.; Juma, Shanil; Beharka, Alison; Bapna, Mahendra S.; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Meydani, Simin N.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 13, No. 9, 09.2002, p. 543-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arjmandi, Bahram H. ; Juma, Shanil ; Beharka, Alison ; Bapna, Mahendra S. ; Akhter, Mohammed P. ; Meydani, Simin N. / Vitamin E improves bone quality in the aged but not in young adult male mice. In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 543-549.
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